Last edited by Dairr
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of Portuguese trade with West Africa, 1440-1521. found in the catalog.

Portuguese trade with West Africa, 1440-1521.

Ivana Elbl

Portuguese trade with West Africa, 1440-1521.

by Ivana Elbl

  • 227 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Pagination717 leaves
Number of Pages717
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14763956M

  The Portuguese in West Africa, brings together a collection of documents - all in new English translation - that illustrate aspects of the encounters between the Portuguese and the peoples of North and West Africa in the period from to /5(11). Slavery and Slave Trade in West Africa, Patrick Manning. Slavery and slave trade, In , a West African population of perhaps 20 to 25 persons million lived in relative stability. This population, while divided into numerous ethnic, linguistic, and political.

CONTENTS vvii Doc. 37 The slave trade from west Africa to the Cape Verde Islands in the sixteenth century Doc. 38 The slave trade in the Cape Verde Islands, 9. Conflict in the kingdom of Kongo in the s Doc. 39 Christianity and a disputed succession in the kingdom of Kongo Doc. 40 The Jaga invasions Beginning in the s, navigators sailing under the Portuguese flag explored from Africa's west coast all the way to the Cape of Good Hope, which they rounded in

This added to the overall number of slaves which Portuguese ships carried. Records show the total figure to be 4,, enslaved Africans. Lisbon, in Portugal, was the major port involved in the Portuguese slave trade. From here, ships went to West Africa and took enslaved Africans across the Atlantic Ocean to the Portugese-owned colony of Brazil. 1. I have analyzed the origins of antislavery thought in two books: The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture (Oxford University Press, ) and The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution (Cornell University Press, ). 2. For some of this information I am much indebted to Seymour Drescher, “The Role of Jews in the Transatlantic Slave Trade,” Immigrants and .


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Portuguese trade with West Africa, 1440-1521 by Ivana Elbl Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Portuguese in West Africa, brings together a collection of documents - all in new English translation - that illustrate aspects of the encounters between the Portuguese and the peoples of North and West Africa in the period from to and the beginnings of the black diaspora associated with the slave trade.

The /5(11). The Portuguese in West Africa, brings together a collection of documents - all in new English translation - that illustrate aspects of the encounters between the Portuguese and the peoples of North and West Africa in the period from to --This text refers to the paperback edition/5(11).

The Portuguese in West Africa, – brings together a collection of documents - all in new English translation - that illustrate aspects of the encounters between the Portuguese and the peoples of North and West Africa in the period from to This period witnessed the diaspora of the Sephardic Jews, the emigration of Portuguese to West Africa and the.

Portuguese trading stations in West Africa and the slave trade. Portuguese expansion into Africa began with the desire of King John I to gain access to the gold-producing areas of West Africa.

The trans-Saharan trade routes between Songhay and the North African traders provided Europe with gold coins used to trade spices, silks and other. The Portuguese quickly transitioned into a trade network with African nobility and slavers.

Prince Infante D. Henrique began selling African slaves in Lagos in InPope Nicholas V gave Portugal the rights to continue the slave trade in West Africa, under the provision that they convert all people who are enslaved. The Portuguese soon. The slave trade out of West Africa eventually made Cidade Velha in Santiago one of the wealthiest cities in the Portuguese empire.

In addition to trading posts, Portugal established colonies on previously uninhabited Atlantic African islands that would later serve as collection points for captives and commodities to be shipped to Iberia, and.

Portuguese Explorations and West Africa The expeditions were sponsored by Prince Henry of Portugal, who founded a center for seamanship around and earned himself the title of the Navigator. At the center, information about tides and currents was collected, more accurate charts and maps were drawn, techniques for determining longitude were.

transatlantic slave trade, part of the global slave trade that transported 10–12 million enslaved Africans to the Americas from the 16th to the 19th century. In the ‘triangular trade,’ arms and textiles went from Europe to Africa, slaves from Africa to the Americas, and sugar and coffee from the Americas to Europe.

Portuguese interests on the west coast of Africa. While on an expedi­ tion to the Canary Islands inHenry'ssquire Gil Eanes sailed south of Cape Bojador, a point of land adjacent to the islands that had come to be regarded by some Europeans at that time as the southern limit ofhabitable territory in Africa.'Eanes'sachievement encouraged.

Cover of Crónica dos feitos da Guiné by Gomes Eanes de Zurara, published inParis, France, courtesy of the Bibliothèque nationale de France. King Alfonso V commissioned the Crónica, which was first composed by Zurara in This chronicle documents the early development of Portuguese interests in large-scale slave trafficking out of West Africa.

In the first place, the Portuguese initiated what eventually became the Trans-Atlantic slave trade mainly through slave raids along the coasts of Africa. The first of these raids came in and was led by Lançarote de Freitas.

The problem with raiding for slaves was that it. Books; The Portuguese in West Africa, –; The slave trade; The Portuguese in West Africa, – Zurara's long discussion of the moral issues involved in the slave trade is of great interest. Although he reaches the conclusion that the trade is justified because the souls of the slaves will be saved, and piously concludes that.

The Atlantic slave trade started inwhen people snatched from the newly-discovered coast of West Africa were put up for sale in Lagos, now a laidback Portuguese beach resort on Europe’s southwestern tip. Brass. Trade with the Portuguese probably encouraged the growth of brass casting in Benin at this time.

Although West Africans invented the smelting of copper and zinc ores and the casting of brass at least as long ago as the 10th century, they did not produce enough metal to supply the casting industry of Benin city, which gave such splendor to the king’s palace.

The Portuguese in West Africa, – brings together a collection of documents - all in new English translation - that illustrate aspects of the encounters between the Portuguese and the peoples of North and West Africa in the period from to West Africa is west of an imagined north-south axis lying close to 10° east longitude.

The Atlantic Ocean forms the western and southern borders of the West African region. The northern border is the Sahara Desert, with the Ranishanu Bend generally considered the northernmost part of the region.

The eastern border is less precise, with some placing it at the Benue Trough. In 70 AD the Romans invaded Israel causing millions of Israelites to escape to Africa. “In his book,The Slave Trade. The Portuguese traveler said this: wandering Jews of West Africa. There were two main types of European trading community in West Africa: 1, informal communities, where Europeans settled, married women from the area, and with them formed African families who often became important in local trade networks; 2, more formal communities which grew up in the fortified trading posts along the coast, or factories.

By all accounts, the Portuguese capital of Lisbon is a strikingly beautiful city, but—like so many entrepôt Mediterranean cities of its kind—it is one built on blood.

Beginning in the fifteenth century, the Portuguese launched what would become the modern slave trade off the coast of West Africa tha. Southern Africa - Southern Africa - European and African interaction from the 15th through the 18th century: The first Europeans to enter Southern Africa were the Portuguese, who from the 15th century edged their way around the African coast in the hope of outflanking Islam, finding a sea route to the riches of India, and discovering additional sources of food.

While numerous works cited here deal with the earlier period of the Portuguese presence (see also the related Oxford Bibliographies articles on Kongo and the Coastal States of West Central Africa, Angola, Mozambique, and Guinea Bissau), the principal focus is on the age of formalized control by the Portuguese state from the midth century.Essay.

Access to commodities such as fabrics, spices, and gold motivated a European quest for a faster means to reach South Asia. It was this search that led the Portuguese down the coast of West Africa to Sierra Leone in Due to several technological and cultural advantages, Portugal dominated world trade for nearly years, from the fifteenth to the sixteenth century.

The Portuguese first began to kidnap people from the west coast of Africa and to take those they enslaved back to Europe. It is estimated that by the early 16th century as much as 10% of Lisbon's.